University of Toronto

Innis Alumni & Friends

Queer Spirits Film Festival returns to Innis Town Hall

6 Films, 2 Days 

March 14 & 21, 2014  at Innis Town Hall (3:30 pm)

Registration not required

The selected documentary films feature the City of Toronto or UofT, and offer stories of gender queer, LGBT, Jewish, Christian, Queer seniors, Jamaican LGBT human rights and radical queers, and featuring the Toronto premiere of “Big Joy”, the story of James Boughton.

Out Late- Five individuals made the courageous decision to come out as LGBT in their 50s, 60s or 70s. Hear the touching stories of the choices they made and what has been so freeing and life-altering about their decision.

The Abominable Crime- This film is told through the voices of a mother and activist set in Jamaica. Amidst anti-gay violence, Simone, a young lesbian single mother must choose between hiding with her daughter in her home country or to seek asylum abroad. Maurice is a leading Jamaican human rights activist who won’t let death threats stop him from speaking out against discrimination

Queerology- This short documentary features Michiko Bown-Kai, a U of T theology student and ministry candidate. Follow their quest for understanding, passion, and freedom as they educate viewers about queerness, faith and ministry.

CAMP- In this video Alexis Mitchell plays with “camp” environments, the secrets of her relationship to Jewish history, culture, and religion, including a queer reading of Purim, an imaginative take on the censored passages of Ann Frank’s diary, and a haircut with her grand-father.  Mitchell uses “camp” to explore temporary built environments and uncover what we hide in them.

Big Joy- “Adventures of James Broughton.” Avant garde poet and queer visionary, Broughton’s mantra of embracing your passions and becoming the person of your dreams is seen through his work as a pre-Beat era poet, filmmaker, lover, gay man, and artist. His words: “Follow Your Own Weird” gave Broughten a big spirituality lived “through and beyond” oppression, acted openly and with “big joy.”

Letters – Later in life Barbara Center rediscovers her Jewish heritage and identity in the coming out process, and deepens the connection to her past and present, her family and her shule.

 

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